Peanut Butter & Jelly

Peanut Butter & Jelly: If only life were that simple

Thursday, July 13, 2006

You Needn't Fear Technology

If you asked anyone under 19 years of age, what would help them more in life, solving equations, or blogging, you could be surprised at what they'd say.

But for my generation, generation "m," or "X-Plus," technology could be the only advancement we have over previous generations. Yes, the generations that had all the wonders of libraries, know-it-all teachers and professors, and parents who could drive them in the right direction, could be the ones that face the most difficulties in the future. Because, as you'll see, where would Algebra and Geometry actually ever help a person in real-life situations that we face in our daily life? Well, they really wouldn't. But this is not to draw the conclusion that advanced mathematical skills are completely worthless, but to say that they're simply unneeded and unwanted at best, would be considerably accurate.

Because, you see, as technology progresses, so does our capabilities to comprehend it. And, especially, to teenagers and such other "Generation M"ers who employ it in their daily life. It was thought last year, that the popular social-networking site Myspace.com was the second most visited site. Google being sixth on the list. Teenagers and preteens alike, are the ones contributing to this. And what better way to express ourselves, than through the Internet? On the Internet, there is no wrong way to go about our daily life. If someone is bothering us, we simply block them, if we want to exchange our favorite songs with each other, or say, homework, we are free to do so.

But with all this technology comes a grave consequence. According to nearly every source in the country, you would believe that the amount of children lacking basic language skills is growing ever higher. And to any teacher you ask, the handwriting skills of each young individual in this country is declining at a quick and steady rate.

But, where, might I ask, would we ever need it? How many jobs in America still require neat penmanship? I mean, you might as well be requiring them to have skills on using a steamboat. Because, that is what our education is in this country: Teach them everything they'll never need, and nothing they'll ever use.

In this country, we are home to advanced technology, and what was once only a pipe dream to our ancestors, is now reality. In one hundred years, we've perfected a way of long-distance communication, imaginative storytelling through special effects, and an ever-quickening way of delivering news to people who want it. And yet, in our American public school systems, we still believe that teaching our young children something that may have helped their ancestors a hundred years is still teaching them. Well, I'm sorry, but that steamboat has sailed away, off into the distance, never to return again.

People, technology is nothing to fear, but it is something to embrace. It is something that we cannot stop, and should not. Technology is not something that has created more areas of concern for my generation, but rather it has created a new way of communication, storytelling, and education. And those who don't embrace it, will be left in the dust.

Wednesday, July 05, 2006

Natural Global Warming: I think not!

Some politicians point out that global warming is a natural occurrence, and I agree, the earth does go through different environmental changes over time. It cools down to an ice age and then heats back up again. There is all the scientific evidence in the world that would prove this theory correct, but—

I would also like to remind these politicians that the change is steady, and only raises one degree for every thousand or so years, at best. What we've seen is an incredible change in climate over the past fifty years. Some propose that the effect of the temperature being raised only a few degrees has little or no effect, and that it simply means, ignorantly stated, that animal and plant species could easily adapt to the environmental changes caused by carbon dioxide and other dioxins in the atmosphere.

I would like to ask everyone in America, now, to please do what you can to save energy. It doesn't mean buying a tiny little car, or spending a truckload on energy-saving appliances. It means turning off a light when you leave the room. It means unplugging things you don't need twenty-four hours a day. If you could simply do these things, we could save this world from ultimate self-destruction. After all, global warming is only reversible for another ten years and after that it is too late.